Tennessee Catholic Schools: We Will Take Your Vouchers, But Keep Your State Tests

With all due respect, we’re not rolling like that in Tennessee. The voucher bill targeting Memphis students on a 5-year trial basis suffered a blow (and rightfully so) from the Tennessee Catholic Public Policy Commission. Legislators got word that at least 24 Catholic schools are happy to take the money but are not willing to take the state test TNReady. I don’t know many people crazy about … Continue reading Tennessee Catholic Schools: We Will Take Your Vouchers, But Keep Your State Tests

Nashville Charter School Leaders Join Others to Oppose Budget that Helps Them, Hurt Others

A group of concerned charter school leaders from across the country submitted a letter to the editor expressing concern about the proposed federal funding cuts likely to hurt students’ prospects outside of the K-12 framework. The letter originally appeared in the Monday, March 28, 2017 issue of USA Today. See below. I’m proud to see that many of those charter school leaders represent schools right here in Nashville. Shout … Continue reading Nashville Charter School Leaders Join Others to Oppose Budget that Helps Them, Hurt Others

Changing the Game: 26 NEW Rules for the Ed Reform Debate

Originally posted on Citizen Education by Citizen Contributor on March 23, 2017. Chris Stewart of Education Post and blogger extraordinaire gives us food for thought about how to approach the ed reform debate; and it happens to fits nicely with the March 29th Volume and Light post  “They Planning for Our Future, None Of Us Involved.” Buckle up. The narrative of people who oppose ‘school choice’ is well documented. The … Continue reading Changing the Game: 26 NEW Rules for the Ed Reform Debate

“They Planning For Our Future, None Of Our People Involved” – A Reminder From A Tribe Called Quest

Education advocacy–and I’m talking mainly about the debate on charter schools, vouchers, and tracking school progress (aka accountability)–deserves your attention. It doesn’t matter what you’ve heard or what you think you know, sit back and take a look at what’s happening nationally and in your own backyard. Too many people get their information from one side of the debate or the other. I am not … Continue reading “They Planning For Our Future, None Of Our People Involved” – A Reminder From A Tribe Called Quest

Saturday Morning reMIX: EdStories from March 20 – March 24

It’s Spring Break in Nashville and the most popular ticket in town was the voucher legislation dancing its way through the Tennessee legislature. The bill targeting Memphis families zoned to failing schools passed the House Education Committee this week. The legislation now moves to the House Government Operations Committee and is pending in the Senate’s Finance, Ways and Means Committee. And the tango continues… 5 Things … Continue reading Saturday Morning reMIX: EdStories from March 20 – March 24

ESSA: From Hiding Black Students to Making Them Disappear

Tennessee schools might be “hiding dropouts” and gaming the accountability system. That’s the finding of a recent report by the data-centric journalism group ProPublica. The report, while focused mostly on Florida, suggests schools all over the country (again, possibly in TN) may be pushing low-performing students, many of whom are black, into “alternative schools,” as a way of preventing their low test scores and graduation … Continue reading ESSA: From Hiding Black Students to Making Them Disappear

According to Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., Federal Education Law is Good for Students of Color

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), we believe, offers African American parents more opportunities to get involved in determining the quality of education for their students at the local level. This is an interesting take on the Every Student Succeeds Act offered by Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA). While the law is to be commended as a … Continue reading According to Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., Federal Education Law is Good for Students of Color