Teacher Residency Program Committed to Quality, Diversity, and Nashville’s Future

After bellyaching about the disproportionate ratio of teachers of color to students of color, nationally and locally, a friend recommended a visit to the local teacher residency program working to be part of the solution. According to its website, the Nashville Teacher Residency program:

“recruits and trains recent, non-education major college graduates to become high-performing middle and high school math and English teachers serving low-income students in Nashville’s district and charter schools.”

In other words, they help recent college grads, and working professionals from other industries become teachers. Our schools need people with different backgrounds, different areas of expertise, and different perspectives. And the Nashville Teacher Residency provides it, at least for some schools.

So I reached out, and got an invitation to come and see what they’re all about.

The Program

On a late afternoon in May, just as the school/work day transitioned, I stepped into one of Nashville’s oldest school buildings. What used to be Cameron High School is now home to two LEAD Schools: LEAD Academy High and Cameron Middle.

Two friendly faces greeted me to the historic space: The residency’s director, Randall Lahann—a teacher-prep veteran hailing from a Boston residency program—and managing director, Holly Tilden. The residency program is in good company as the high school recently celebrated its 3rd consecutive year of 100 percent college acceptance for its graduating class. Meanwhile Cameron, a traditional Metro School converted into a charter school, is a 2015 Tennessee Reward School, recognizing superior academic progress.

After finding an open classroom, Lahann and Tilden gave me a rundown of the program’s inaugural year before excusing themselves to begin part two of their day. The director and managing director literally do it all (well almost). Besides running the place, they also meet with local bloggers (ahem), handle all the HR stuff for recruiting and selecting new residents and even teach the residents.

At the present, the dynamic duo is successfully leading the first group of soon-to-be teachers to completion, which, noticeably, is powered by an authentic commitment to quality and diversity.

Seeing is Believing

I heard the words “commitment to diversity” and read them on the Nashville Teacher Residency website, but the proof is ever in the pudding. After my brief (but information-packed) meeting with the residency’s multi-faceted leaders, I walked across the hall into a classroom of young adults, some at their desks, others stocking up on snacks, all preparing for the evening ahead.

IMG_1837
Saniha, resident, Nashville Teacher Residency 
As I meandered through the desks, the commitment to diversity was confirmed. Yes, 70 percent of the residency’s first cohort is comprised of residents of color with an astounding 100% cohort retention rate. Impressive. Resident retention is important here because the program does something different by offering classroom experience on the front end.

Instead of theorizing teaching techniques and offering scenarios that might misrepresent urban district’s realities, inexperienced hopefuls are submerged, feet first, in an effort to thwart the typical travails of a first-year (and, many cases, one-time) teacher.

Surprisingly, this eight week trial by fire did little to deter the inaugural class which entered the residency in July 2016 and is now headed for teacherdom. For ten months, two days a week and three hours an evening, residents are instructed in math and English as well as community and culture. Classes are led by Lahann, Tilden, and KIPP Nashville High School mentor teacher Kate Stasik and special guests are invited to speak on community and culture.

The program also requires residents to work with a mentor teacher inside a real classroom setting. Yes, the residency program is intense, yet, many of the residents have full-time jobs while fulfilling the program’s requirements and a fraction are themselves parents.

But, I saw no regrets.

IMG_1834
Ciana Calhoun, resident, Nashville Teacher Residency

 

 

For instance, twenty-six year old MTSU graduate and entrepreneur Ciana Calhoun commented on the intensity and authenticity of the program saying “I’m tired, but they have prepared me for real classroom experiences.” Resident Eric DeVaughn, a musician and former W. O. Smith drum teacher, also expressed excitement about entering the classroom next fall at Lead High School.

Life Happens Fast

Sometimes a dose of real life is required before one’s career path becomes clear. The Nashville Teacher Residency provides second chances to recent college graduates with a clearer understanding of their passion. Additionally, partner schools invest in residents by providing a $25,000 stipend and a place to work and study. For residents with children, a $5,000 loan is available. Sounds good to be true? Soon-to-be teacher Ciana thought so, too, “I thought it was a hoax!”

The Real Deal

IMG_1838
Eric DeVaughn, resident, Nashville Teacher Residency
Currently, eight partner schools invest in the residency program and soon hundreds of students will benefit from a full-time Ciana and Eric who are fully equipped to deliver top-notch instruction without losing time to acclimation and re-training. The program succeeds through its commitment to diversity, solid retention rate, intense program of study, classroom experiences that represent urban school district realities, and commitment to its residents.

 

Why Alternative Licensure Programs?

Ever the company girl, there was a time I was completely skeptical of outsourcing. I get it now! Residency and other alternative licensure programs like Nashville Teacher Residency, Relay and Teach for America, provide an integral service to school districts with deficits in minority representation and teachers prepared with tools not typically offered in traditional programs.

Like other urban districts, Nashville suffers from a deficit of teachers of color in proportion to its students of color. I know Metro Schools has committed to increase these numbers and I hope they take advantage of programs like the Nashville Teacher Residency that can help ramp up diversity and quality.

Oh yeah, a huge congratulations to Nashville’s Teacher Residency’s first cohort who completed their residency as of this writing!  Onward!

 

Published by

Vesia Hawkins

Extremely passionate about education choices, fairness, and good football.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s