Who Is Likely To Return The Most To Our Society?

This post is about the value of life and the weight arbitrarily assigned to various groups by people in power. While writing this blog, Nashville witnessed another Black man’s death at the hands of its police department. Daniel Hambrick, the deceased, was 25 years old and said to have been armed at the time of the shooting. The officer, White and also 25, has less … Continue reading Who Is Likely To Return The Most To Our Society?

What’s A Celebration Of Freedom Without Recognizing Our Right To Literacy?

“Siri!” I bellowed. “Is there such thing as a right to literacy?” “Interesting question.” During a time when half of the country is in a desperate search for answers to life’s most basic questions about humanity’s most basic rights, Siri is about as useless as Michigan’s state department of education. The state that borders four of the five Great Lakes, houses the ghosts of Motown … Continue reading What’s A Celebration Of Freedom Without Recognizing Our Right To Literacy?

Valor Collegiate’s Success Rewarded As Part of Foundation’s Commitment to High-Quality Schools

I’m sure you know all about Valor Collegiate Academies, a local Nashville public charter school powerhouse that’s blowing everybody away with their students’ test score results. This charter network is part of a special group of Nashville schools that prove that ALL students can learn despite obstacles. Valor has received national recognition for their work and now they’re getting kudos plus a healthy check. A … Continue reading Valor Collegiate’s Success Rewarded As Part of Foundation’s Commitment to High-Quality Schools

To Choose Or Not To Choose, The Greatest Non-Debate

Last weekend a friend tagged me in a high-octane, drawn out tweet-debate with some of the greatest minds in education. Mini-essays of no more than 280 characters flooded my mentions late Friday night and throughout Saturday. A big, fat battle line was drawn, one side choice and the other not so much. I was drafted to join TeamChoice to defend families rights to choose and … Continue reading To Choose Or Not To Choose, The Greatest Non-Debate

5 Things You Missed at Summer’s Most LIT Ticket In Town

This blogger loves what she loves and has no problem publicly professing her love for Project LIT Community! The effort-of-the-heart that populates book deserts with culturally-relevant books and hosts a monthly community book club at the school launched by Maplewood High School English teacher Dr. Jarred Amato and a group of students. I’ve dedicated several blogs to this effort as it something that I believe has … Continue reading 5 Things You Missed at Summer’s Most LIT Ticket In Town

Black Families Shed Systemic Shackles And Chase Excellence

There is no freedom without choice. I know that’s pretty basic. Anyone who thinks about freedom for five minutes could easily come to that conclusion, and I know I’m not the first to say it, but I think it’s profound. The struggle for freedom is as old as humanity itself. There have always been those who try to limit freedom—limit choices—for certain groups, and for … Continue reading Black Families Shed Systemic Shackles And Chase Excellence

Communities of Resurrection: A Post-Easter Message of Social Justice and Hope

Volume and Light is all about social justice, particularly as it relates to education. But today’s post is a little different. This week I attended a sermon given by my friend Morgan Stafford who I’d been asking to be a guest on my blog. Morgan invited me to coffee last year after reading my op-ed on Nashville’s growing prosperity on the backs of the undereducated, … Continue reading Communities of Resurrection: A Post-Easter Message of Social Justice and Hope